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MEEG 112, Statics

Syllabus


    This is the first course in the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum. Despite the size of the lectures, an interactive classroom is maintained using i-Clickers. Partnering with other department faculty, team-based Design and Build Challenges are incorporated through the semester to reinforce lecture content and complementary engineering skills. Honors sections meet with the regular sections and add problems involving “statics in the real world,” MATLAB-based numerical problem solving, and the inclusion of additional material such as the method of virtual work.



MEEG 451/651, Introduction to Microsystems

Syllabus


    This elective course for junior/senior undergraduates and graduate students uses an entirely Problem Based Learning approach built on five highly open-ended microdevice design problems. The problems are devised in a sequence so as to require investigation into scaling laws; microsystem fabrication techniques; sensing and actuating physics at the small scale; and the main mechanical, fluidic, chemical, and biological applications. Lectures are provided upon student request on topics they feel will help in answering the current problem. While the theme of the course content is microelectromechanical systems, a central purpose is the development of skills in self-directed learning and technical written and oral communications.



MEEG 867, Solid State Electrochemistry

Syllabus


   This lecture course is intended for advanced graduate students. Topics include mass and charge transport in solids, point defect equilibria, electrode kinetics, and common measurement techniques. Particular attention is given to principles relevant to batteries and fuel cells. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. relate thermodynamic defect equilibria to charge and mass transport kinetics in both crystalline and amorphous/polymeric materials;

  2. explain the electrochemical equilibrium and rate limiting steps for reactions that occur at the electrode-electrolyte interface;

  3. describe the operating principle behind batteries, fuel cells, and other solid state electrochemical devices; and

  4. use common measurement techniques to analyze solid state electrochemical systems and interpret relevant experimental results.

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